nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR
Zoom Info
nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR
Zoom Info
nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR
Zoom Info

nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.

Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.

And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.

"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.

He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.

Continue reading.

Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.

Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.

Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

engineeringhistory:

Rose for Lord Kelvin’s compass, patented in the 1880s. The Kelvin Compass was used for maritime navigation and employed a system of two correcting magnets.

engineeringhistory:

Rose for Lord Kelvin’s compass, patented in the 1880s. The Kelvin Compass was used for maritime navigation and employed a system of two correcting magnets.

the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:
"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." — from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”
"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." — from “Indian Camp”
"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." — from The Garden of Eden
"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." — from A Farewell to Arms
[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” — from Hills Like White Elephants
"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." — from For Whom the Bell Tolls
[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”— from The Sun Also Rises
"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."— from A Moveable Feast
"The old man was dreaming about the lions."— from The Old Man and the Sea
Zoom Info
the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:
"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." — from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”
"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." — from “Indian Camp”
"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." — from The Garden of Eden
"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." — from A Farewell to Arms
[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” — from Hills Like White Elephants
"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." — from For Whom the Bell Tolls
[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”— from The Sun Also Rises
"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."— from A Moveable Feast
"The old man was dreaming about the lions."— from The Old Man and the Sea
Zoom Info

the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:

"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." 
— from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro

"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." 
— from “Indian Camp

"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." 
— from The Garden of Eden

"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." 
— from A Farewell to Arms

[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” 
— from Hills Like White Elephants

"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." 
— from For Whom the Bell Tolls

[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”
Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.
“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”
— from The Sun Also Rises

"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."
— from A Moveable Feast

"The old man was dreaming about the lions."
— from The Old Man and the Sea

bryskye:

Not sure if I ever shared these on tubmlr or not.…well, if I did, it was years ago and most people will have missed them.Anyway, I have a collection of 6 very special photos that came directly from the photo processing lab of HMS Illustrious back in 1995.They were given to me by one of the aircraft handlers while I was stuck in a Greek hospital in Corfu (that was a fun holiday…)A completely chance meeting.
This was one of the earliest sea deployments of the Sea Harrier FA.2, possibly even the first that was made up of only the updated version.The aircraft lack any squadron markings and one (closest the front in this photo) is wearing the dark sea grey and high visibility markings that were more typical of the FRS.1
The Sea Harrier FA.2 was the very final incarnation of the original all-British first generation of Harrier.It’s Ferranti Blue Vixen radar was one of the most advanced of it’s time and formed the basis for the Eurofighter Typhoon’s CAPTOR.
This made the SHAR FA.2 the first fighter in Europe to have AIM-120 AMRAAM capability, long before the likes of the F-14, F-15 and the RAF’s Tornado F3 interceptors were made compatible with the new missile.
The SHAR was retired ahead of schedule in 2006 without a direct replacement, leaving the Royal Navy with no means of fixed wing air defence.While they were replaced in the short term by the Harrier GR.9 (itself retired in 2010), the GR9 is an attack aircraft that, while equipped with Sidewinders for self-defence, lacked both a radar and operational gun in UK service.

bryskye:

Not sure if I ever shared these on tubmlr or not.
…well, if I did, it was years ago and most people will have missed them.

Anyway, I have a collection of 6 very special photos that came directly from the photo processing lab of HMS Illustrious back in 1995.
They were given to me by one of the aircraft handlers while I was stuck in a Greek hospital in Corfu (that was a fun holiday…)
A completely chance meeting.

This was one of the earliest sea deployments of the Sea Harrier FA.2, possibly even the first that was made up of only the updated version.
The aircraft lack any squadron markings and one (closest the front in this photo) is wearing the dark sea grey and high visibility markings that were more typical of the FRS.1

The Sea Harrier FA.2 was the very final incarnation of the original all-British first generation of Harrier.
It’s Ferranti Blue Vixen radar was one of the most advanced of it’s time and formed the basis for the Eurofighter Typhoon’s CAPTOR.

This made the SHAR FA.2 the first fighter in Europe to have AIM-120 AMRAAM capability, long before the likes of the F-14, F-15 and the RAF’s Tornado F3 interceptors were made compatible with the new missile.

The SHAR was retired ahead of schedule in 2006 without a direct replacement, leaving the Royal Navy with no means of fixed wing air defence.
While they were replaced in the short term by the Harrier GR.9 (itself retired in 2010), the GR9 is an attack aircraft that, while equipped with Sidewinders for self-defence, lacked both a radar and operational gun in UK service.